From Sand Hill Road To Main Street – Unicorns Going Mainstream
September 7, 2018 | Blog

From Sand Hill Road To Main Street – Unicorns Going Mainstream

Unicorns have come full circle.

In 2016, Mary Jo White, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, bluntly warned investors about excessive unicorn valuations and lack of transparency. Unicorns, private growth firms worth at least $1 billion, may not have sufficient checks in place to safeguard investors, she said.

However, earlier this month, Jay Clayton, who succeeded White as SEC chair, said he’s making it a top priority to encourage people to invest in those very same unicorns. One idea under consideration: instead of just allowing people with a certain amount of wealth to buy private securities, the SEC would also take into consideration an investor’s education and professional credentials.

“The SEC is committed to efforts to develop a regulatory framework that equally serves…the social media company looking to conduct its IPO and the Main Street investor saving for the future,” Clayton told a conference in Nashville.

This is a big deal for the private markets. The leader of the most powerful financial regulator in the United States seems to think unicorns are a legitimate asset and worthy of Main Street money.

Chairman Jay ClaytonU.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Jay Clayton, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission

“Opening up the private markets allows more people the opportunity to back early-stage companies they believe in and to participate in their success,” former SEC Commissioner Troy Paredes told me. “There are no guarantees, but venture-capital-like returns can be very attractive.”

Paredes, who served under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, founded Paredes Consulting in New York, which advises companies on regulation and corporate governance issues.

But why the sudden shift in just two years?

An unexpected consequence

We first need some historical context. For one thing, no one really anticipated that these companies would even exist.

In 2010, President Obama signed the Jumpstart our Businesses Act (JOBS Act), a law meant to encourage more companies to go public. The act allowed companies to more easily solicit investors and keep private information like operating performance and executive compensation.

Instead of filing IPOs, companies chose to stay private longer because they were raising significant sums of capital. As result, there are nearly 270 unicorns in the world, late stage growth firms worth at least $1 billion.

Regulators seemed unsure how to deal with this new phenomenon. When then SEC chair White made her remarks in 2016, two high profile unicorns were attracting negative attention.

Zenefits, backed by venture capital powerhouse Andreesen Horowitz, forced its CEO to resign because employees were selling insurance without obtaining proper broker licenses. And Theranos, founded by then superstar entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes, faced questions about whether its blood testing technology really worked.

Zenefits eventually paid millions of dollars of fines to state regulators. Theranos shut down and federal prosecutors indicted Holmes for securities fraud.

“Rapidly growing enterprises present significant risks if the appropriate control structure is not in place,” White told a conference at Stanford University at the time. “As the latest batch of startups mature, generate revenue, achieve significant valuations but stay private, it is important to assess whether they are likewise maturing their governance structures and internal control environments to match their size and market impact.”

There was also considerable doubt on whether these billion dollar valuations were really true. A number of unicorns suffered down round IPOs or were sold to buyers at prices much lower than their original valuations.

Unicorns emerge into a legitimate asset class

But over the past two years, unicorns have offered better transparency and market performance.

From 2016 to 2018 to date, 64 percent of unicorns, including Spotify and DocuSign, saw their IPO prices jump above their private valuations, compared to just 10 percent in 2015, according to a SharesPost analysis.

Mega unicorns like Uber and Airbnb now offer some financial data to the public. Mutual funds have also not hesistated to mark down their unicorn holdings should circumstances call for it.

“Over the years, we believe private growth equity asset asset class has become less opaque, valuations have become better informed and accredited investors increasingly feel they have what they need to invest with confidence,” said Rohit Kulkarni, SharesPost’s director of research.

There has also been a significant shift of wealth from the public to private markets.

Since 2009, emerging growth firms have raised $330 billion, including single rounds of more than $100 million; the number of such mega financings has grown 830 percent in recent years.

Fewer people owning stocks

What has received less attention is that significantly fewer Americans are buying publicly-traded stock despite the Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq reaching record highs.

From 2007 to 2013, the percentage of U.S. households owning stock dropped from 49.1 percent to 46 percent, according to study on household wealth published last November by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). It then rebounded to 49 percent in 2016, though still below its 2007 peak.

In 2016, 54.9 million U.S. households, or 43.6 percent, owned a mutual fund, noticeably down from 2013 when 56.7 million, or 46.3 percent, did, according to research from the Investment Company Institute.

Gallup recently released a poll that says that for the 5th straight year, most Americans think real estate, not equity, is the best way to create wealth.

Unicorns might offer more Americans who have shunned stocks an opportunity to increase their wealth, especially as wages continue to stagnate.

“The private markets are awash in capital these days,” Clayton recently told the Wall Street Journal. “The question is, who is participating?”

Answer: not enough people.

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CONFLICTS

This report is being published by SharesPost Research LLC, and distributed by SharesPost Financial Corporation, a member of FINRA/SIPC. SharesPost Research LLC, SharesPost Financial Corporation and SP Investments Management, LLC, an investment adviser registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, are wholly owned subsidiaries of SharesPost, Inc.

Recipients who are not market professionals or clients of SharesPost Financial Corporation should seek the advice of their own personal financial advisors before making any investment decisions based on this report. None of the information contained in this report represents an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, any security, and no buy or sell recommendation should be implied, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or governmental jurisdiction in which said offer, solicitation, or sale would be unlawful under the securities laws of any such jurisdiction.

This report does not constitute an offer to provide investment advice or service. Registered representatives of SharesPost Financial Corporation do not (1) advise any member on the merits or advisability of a particular investment or transaction, or (2) assist in the determination of fair value of any security or investment, or (3) provide legal, tax, or transactional advisory services.

ANALYST CERTIFICATION

The analyst(s) certifies that the views expressed in this report accurately reflect the personal views of such analyst(s) about any and all of the subject securities or issuers, and that no part of such analyst compensation was, is, or will be, directly or indirectly related to the specific views contained in this report.

Analyst compensation is based upon various factors, including the overall performance of SharesPost, Inc. and its subsidiaries, and the performance and productivity of such analyst, including feedback from clients of SharesPost Financial Corporation and other stakeholders in our ecosystem, the quality of such analyst’s research and the analyst’s contribution to the growth and development of our overall research effort. Analyst compensation is derived from all revenue sources of SharesPost, Inc., including brokerage sales.

DISCLAIMER

This report does not contain a complete analysis of every material fact regarding any issuer, industry, or security. The opinions expressed in this report reflect our judgment at this date and are subject to change. The information contained in this report has been obtained from sources we consider to be reliable; however, we cannot guarantee the accuracy of all such information.

Any securities offered are offered by SharesPost Financial Corporation, member FINRA/SIPC. SharesPost Financial Corporation and SP Investments Management are wholly owned subsidiaries of SharesPost, Inc. Certain affiliates of these entities may act as principals in such transactions.

Investing in private company securities is not suitable for all investors. An investment in private company securities is highly speculative and involves a high degree of risk. It should only be considered as a long-term investment. You must be prepared to withstand a total loss of your investment. Private company securities are also highly illiquid and there is no guarantee that a market will develop for such securities. Each investment also carries its own specific risks and you should complete your own independent due diligence regarding the investment, including obtaining additional information about the company, opinions, financial projections and legal or other investment advice.

Accordingly, investing in private company securities is appropriate only for those investors who can tolerate a high degree of risk and do not require a liquid investment.

SharesPost, the SharesPost logo, My SharesPost, the SharesPost Index, and SharesPost Investment Management are all registered trademarks of SharesPost, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Copyright SharesPost, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved.

Thomas Lee

Thomas Lee

Thomas Lee is the Senior Writer at SharesPost. He was previously a business columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle. Lee has written for the Star Tribune in Minneapolis, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and Seattle Times. He is author of “Rebuilding Empires” (St. Martin's Press), his book on the future of big box retail in the digital age.
PLEASE READ THESE IMPORTANT LEGAL NOTICES & DISCLOSURES

CONFLICTS

This report is being published by SharesPost Research LLC, and distributed by SharesPost Financial Corporation, a member of FINRA/SIPC. SharesPost Research LLC, SharesPost Financial Corporation and SP Investments Management, LLC, an investment adviser registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, are wholly owned subsidiaries of SharesPost, Inc.

Recipients who are not market professionals or clients of SharesPost Financial Corporation should seek the advice of their own personal financial advisors before making any investment decisions based on this report. None of the information contained in this report represents an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, any security, and no buy or sell recommendation should be implied, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or governmental jurisdiction in which said offer, solicitation, or sale would be unlawful under the securities laws of any such jurisdiction.

This report does not constitute an offer to provide investment advice or service. Registered representatives of SharesPost Financial Corporation do not (1) advise any member on the merits or advisability of a particular investment or transaction, or (2) assist in the determination of fair value of any security or investment, or (3) provide legal, tax, or transactional advisory services.

ANALYST CERTIFICATION

The analyst(s) certifies that the views expressed in this report accurately reflect the personal views of such analyst(s) about any and all of the subject securities or issuers, and that no part of such analyst compensation was, is, or will be, directly or indirectly related to the specific views contained in this report.

Analyst compensation is based upon various factors, including the overall performance of SharesPost, Inc. and its subsidiaries, and the performance and productivity of such analyst, including feedback from clients of SharesPost Financial Corporation and other stakeholders in our ecosystem, the quality of such analyst’s research and the analyst’s contribution to the growth and development of our overall research effort. Analyst compensation is derived from all revenue sources of SharesPost, Inc., including brokerage sales.

DISCLAIMER

This report does not contain a complete analysis of every material fact regarding any issuer, industry, or security. The opinions expressed in this report reflect our judgment at this date and are subject to change. The information contained in this report has been obtained from sources we consider to be reliable; however, we cannot guarantee the accuracy of all such information.

Any securities offered are offered by SharesPost Financial Corporation, member FINRA/SIPC. SharesPost Financial Corporation and SP Investments Management are wholly owned subsidiaries of SharesPost, Inc. Certain affiliates of these entities may act as principals in such transactions.

Investing in private company securities is not suitable for all investors. An investment in private company securities is highly speculative and involves a high degree of risk. It should only be considered as a long-term investment. You must be prepared to withstand a total loss of your investment. Private company securities are also highly illiquid and there is no guarantee that a market will develop for such securities. Each investment also carries its own specific risks and you should complete your own independent due diligence regarding the investment, including obtaining additional information about the company, opinions, financial projections and legal or other investment advice.

Accordingly, investing in private company securities is appropriate only for those investors who can tolerate a high degree of risk and do not require a liquid investment.

SharesPost, the SharesPost logo, My SharesPost, the SharesPost Index, and SharesPost Investment Management are all registered trademarks of SharesPost, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Copyright SharesPost, Inc. 2019. All rights reserved.